A promisor is someone who makes a promise to a promisee.

Contract law teaches us whether the promisor is legally obligated to keep his promise.

For example, if Mr. A promises to pay Mr. B $500 then A is the promisor and B is the promisee.  Contract law informs us whether Mr. A is liable if he breaks his promise.

Consider the following example:  Mr. A promises to pay Mr. B $500 and Mr. B says, “Great!  Now I can get that tablet computer I always wanted.”  Is A in legal trouble if he decides not to pay?  Contract law tells us whether the promisor must keep his promise.

Often, you will see more than one promise being made.  A person can be both a promisor and a promisee if he exchanges promises with the other party.  For example, if Mr. A promises to sell his car for $1,000 and Mr. B promises to pay $1,000 when the car is delivered, Mr. A is both a promisor and a promisee because Mr. A and Mr. B made promises to each other. Be careful, and don’t lose track of who is the promisor and who is the promisee with respect to each promise.

Get a Civ Pro Quiz Ebook!

101 Civ Pro Questions and Explanations

Download